Why you should be there

NetHui 2012 brings together everyone with a stake in the Internet to find ways to work together on issues. You should attend NetHui to address the big issues of the Internet and its impact on society. You will make valuable new contacts and have in-depth discussions with people from mulitiple sectors and diverse communities. It’s all about openness and participation and ensuring the Internet works for all of us.

If you can’t make it, consider participating online

Programme

The overall theme is “Shaping the Future Together”, which covers broader issues of Access, Internet Safety, Security, Governance, Business, Openness, Education and more. The first two days revolve around discussions sessions, panels and community Events. The third day features keynotes, a panel and a barcamp with sessions determined by participants on the day!

You can find details of the Keynote Speakers here

You can find copies of some of the presentations below:

Access and human rights (Facilitator Joy Liddicoat)

Approaches to deal with accessibility and inclusion (Facilitator Kathe Tawhiwhirangi-Perry)

International Internet governance – who owns the Internet (Facilitator Geoff Huston)

Internet Governance 101 (Presenter Keith Davidson)

National Internet governance – local issues (Facilitator Keith Davidson)

Resilience to online scams (Faciltiator Lee Chisholm)

State of Security in NZ 101 (Presenter Paul McKitrick)

Internet Infrastructure 101 (Presenter Jairo Gutierrez)

Scene Setting – Wednesday 11 July 2012 (Presenter Vikram Kumar)

Scene Setting – Friday 13 July 2012 (Presenter Vikram Kumar)

Panel Intro – Open Government (Presenter Vikram Kumar)

Keynote – The Internet biographies of New Zealanders – Professor Allan Bell and Philippa Smith, AUT, World Internet Project NZ

 

Collaborative notetaking:

When all together, Discussion Rooms: NZ1, NZ2, NZ3, NZ4, Barcamp: NZ1, NZ2, M1, M2, M3

Wednesday 11 July
8.30amWelcome Coffee

Welcome Coffee

Come early to get your labels and have a coffee with everyone else and find the best seating!
Promenade
9.00amMihi Whakatau - Welcome Ceremony - Kaumātua Brian Joyce

Mihi Whakatau - Welcome Ceremony - Kaumātua Brian Joyce

The traditional Maori welcome to open NetHui 2012
New Zealand 1&2
9.10amWelcome - MC James Elliott

Welcome - MC James Elliott

James Elliott is a lawyer, columnist and comedian. Writer for TV3's 7 Days, Contributor to the NZ Herald, Herald on Sunday and Listener. Humour commentator on the Week That Was on Nine to Noon and Radiosport.
New Zealand 1&2
9.15amOpening Keynote - Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

Opening Keynote - Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

Penny Hulse, Deputy Mayor of Auckland

Penny Hulse brings more than 18 years of local government experience to the role. Penny was first elected to the Waitakere Community Board in 1992 before being elected Chair of the Board in 1994. In 1995 she was elected as a Waitakere City Councillor and as a Trustee of the Waitakere Licensing Trust.

Since then she has served as a Chair on a range of committees including the Healthy City Committee, Safe Community, Environmental Management, City Develoment, Community and Public Health Committee.

Penny’s special areas of interest are Climate Change, Sustainable City Development, Environmental Advocvacy, Community Develoment and Youth. She is Chair of the Auckland Plan Committee and Deputy Chair of the CCO Strategy Review Sub-Committee.

http://nethui.org.nz/keynote-speakers
New Zealand 1&2
9.30amScene Setting - InternetNZ Chief Executive Vikram Kumar

Scene Setting - InternetNZ Chief Executive Vikram Kumar

Reflecting on Internet issues since last year's inaugural NetHui and thinking about the big issues for participants at this year's NetHui.
New Zealand 1&2
9.45amInternational Keynote - Pamela Jones Harbour, introduced by Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff

International Keynote - Pamela Jones Harbour, introduced by Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff

The FTC Enforcement Trifecta and Perspective of a Former Regulator

This keynote will be presented by Pamela Jones Harbour a partner at Fulbright & Jaworski LLP who heads the firm’s Privacy, Competition and Data Protection practice group. Ms. Harbour is well recognized for her knowledge of evolving areas of competition and consumer protection law, including privacy and data security issues. Ms. Harbour will address the FTC’s enforcement trifecta – the Twitter, Facebook, and Google Consent Orders, US and EU Privacy Laws and other regulatory enforcement activities.

About Pamela Jones Harbour
Former Federal Trade Commissioner Pamela Jones Harbour is a partner in Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P.’s antitrust and competition practice. Pamela heads the firm’s Privacy, Competition and Data Protection practice group. She is well recognized for her knowledge of evolving areas of competition and consumer protection law, including privacy and data security issues.

Pamela served on the Federal Trade Commission from 2003 until April 2010. Prior to serving on the Commission, Pamela was an antitrust partner at a New York firm. She previously spent a decade working in the New York Attorney General’s Office, including as Deputy Attorney General, where she investigated and prosecuted a variety of antitrust and consumer protection violations.

During her nearly seven years as a Commissioner, Pamela was instrumental in shaping an ambitious Federal Trade Commission agenda that encompassed a wide variety of competition and consumer protection issues affecting virtually every economic sector. Before joining the FTC, Pamela successfully prosecuted numerous national price-fixing conspiracies as a top litigator in the New York Attorney General’s office, including serving as lead counsel in several multi-state cases and arguing a resale price maintenance (RPM) case, State Oil v. Khan, on behalf of 35 states before the U.S. Supreme Court. During that time, Pamela was chief of the Office’s 150-attorney Public Advocacy Division.

Pamela is recognized internationally for her leadership in the emerging field of privacy and data security. She was the 2010 recipient of the Electronic Privacy Information Center’s (EPIC’s) “Champion of Freedom Award” for her defense of consumer privacy as an FTC Commissioner. In 2011, Pamela was appointed as Co-Chair of the Legal Working Group of the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) – a non-profit organization led by a broad coalition of industry practitioners, corporations, and associations, whose mission is to promote the use of best practices for providing security assurance with cloud computing. As a key member of the U.S. delegation to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summits, she was directly involved in representing U.S. interests during negotiation and future implementation of a global privacy framework related to cross-border data transfers.
New Zealand 1&2
10.45amMorning Tea (and room reorganisaton)

Morning Tea (and room reorganisaton)

A chance to absorb and discuss everything heard in the keynotes, and burn off some energy reorganising the chairs in New Zealand 1&2 if you wish!
Promenade
11.09amNgā Kōrerorero - The Discussions
11.10am
New Zealand 1 - Globalisation & the Law
Copyright and the Internet, facilitated by David Farrar

Copyright and the Internet, facilitated by David Farrar

From the printing press to the copying machine, technological development has prompted numerous changes to copyright throughout its 300 year-old history. But the Internet is the change that flipped copyright on its head. The word itself - copyright - implies that the copyright holder can have some meaningful control over the copying of their works. But this is not the reality of the Internet -- copies can be made instantly with the click of a mouse. How should this conflict be resolved?

This session will feature a first principles discussion of copyright in the digital age. What purpose does protecting copies serve? How can or should that work online? What should the consequences for infringement be? What should the role of Internet intermediaries be? Are there alternative ways to compensate people for their creative works in the digital age?

These and other questions can set the stage for discussion of the Ministry of Economic Development's 2013 review of the Copyright Act, which will focus on the "digital parts" of the Act. Which of the first principles based-ideas could be suggested during the review? Will the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement affect the review? How could the review affect the open Internet?
New Zealand 2 - Rural
Rural Internet - Beyond the Bull (Facilitator: Reg Hammond)

Rural Internet - Beyond the Bull (Facilitator: Reg Hammond)

With the contracts for the Government's Rural Broadband Initiative now let, can we take that deployment as a baseline and identify what gaps remain to be filled - and who will fill them.

What do we mean by gaps? Even after the RBI has been fully deployed there will still be gaps - some remote rural communities and users will still not be covered by the RBI. Others will want more than the 5Mbps guaranteed.

How can rural users and communities make a difference themselves? What other initiatives are in the pipeline from Government, Suppliers and the Communities themselves?

There are two future government initiatives that will have a big impact on the gaps:

The allocation of the Digital Dividend Spectrum - this spectrum is particularly valuable for rural areas - it has greater coverage potential and greater capacity to allow higher broadband speeds/bandwidth on cellular networks. Much depends though on how the government allocates this spectrum - what rules they put around it such as what it should be used for, where it should be used, what timeframe it is deployed in. Then there is the issue of how the available spectrum is divided up - bigger blocks will mean greater bandwith on a particular network whereas smaller block will mean more networks and greater competition - but each will have less spectrum.

The review of the TSO is scheduled for 2013 - the review will probably be wide ranging with options ranging from scrap the TSO all-together to introducing a new universal services obligation that included a minimum internet bandwidth.

Suppliers have big decisions

Chorus and Vodafone have to meet certain obligations under the RBI but beyond that other wireless and cellular suppliers have opportunity to locate equipment on RBI towers and use RBI backhaul fibre. Vodafone and Telecom will face a decision about when they move to LTE the next generation of cellular network which has superior broadband/data capability - this may be tied to them getting digital dividend spectrum.

Chorus is likely to have diverging incentives - - deployment of fibre to the home in many urban areas, maintenance of copper services in rural and urban areas, fibre to cell towers in rural areas.

Smaller wireless providers have both threats and opportunities brought about by the RBI.

Other suppliers of rural goods/services - eg banks, stock merchants, information services (weather, market prices, health, education) should be incentivised to develop low bandwidth apps that work effectively on cellular networks in particular - is that happening?

Rural Users and Communities

What can rural communities do for themselves to fill gaps?
- co-ordinated action within small communities to get suppliers to extend further (eg repeater stations or digging trenches). How can the most be made of what is available -but who's job is it to coordinate action at the local level?
New Zealand 3 - Health
Telehealth and the Internet (facilitator Ernie Newman)

Telehealth and the Internet (facilitator Ernie Newman)

Health services, arguably, are late adopters of ICT. While most sectors of commerce are into at least their third decade of the CRM, ERP and financial systems that revolutionised their business systems, health remains a major user of the fax and snail mail. There remains an assumption that the only way for a patient to consult a clinician is face to face, one to one – email and telephone consultations have barely arrived, let alone video consultation or remote monitoring of health indicators.

This is changing. Some countries have made significant progress. Others have attempted to introduce on-line health information and met with disaster.

New Zealand is neither at the front nor the back of the pack, but we are moving forward resolutely towards Shared Care Records – a form of personal electronic health record – being available on line for every New Zealander and their clinicians by 2014. Ultra-Fast Broadband, and the Rural Broadband Initiative, will be crucial enablers of access. We are aided by some world-class specialist health software vendors.

But personal electronic health records are not the only outcome. Applications of ICT in health are many and varied. They include increased use of virtual clinics and remote diagnosis; remote tele-monitoring of patients; peer and case management review between clinicians and specialists; • Increased efficiency of referral practices; and improving the productivity of the entire health workforce and performance of minor procedures via high speed and high quality networks.

This interactive session will canvass all the above, as well as the complex privacy, access, cultural, systemic and consumer issues that need to be addressed along the way.
New Zealand 4 - Up to Speed
Internet Infrastructure 101 (Presenter: Jairo Gutierrez), followed by Internet Governance 101 (Presenter: Keith Davidson)

Internet Infrastructure 101 (Presenter: Jairo Gutierrez), followed by Internet Governance 101 (Presenter: Keith Davidson)

Internet Infrastructure 101 - This Up to Speed session will start with a brief history of the internet; it will follow with a discussion of its key services and network components (both at the edge and the core). It will then deal with a short, but necessary, look at the fundamental protocols involved. The session will finalise with a discussion of the internet infrastructure in New Zealand.

Internet Governance 101 - A brief history of the Internet, who the major players are and how they became involved, and what tensions have arisen as a result. The Internet grew from its USA academic and military beginnings into a network connecting almost 2 million people. Its heritage is strange, emerging from geek playground to global communications necessity, has seen greater involvement and desire to control arising from individual governments, as the world struggles with the relatively borderless nature brought about by the Internet.
12.10pmLunch

Lunch

If you booked lunch at the conference then head that way, else bring out the packed lunch or get pop out for some fresh air and bite nearby. If you regret not booking lunch at the conference, go see the registration desk and see if you can purchase.
Promenade
1.10pm
New Zealand 1 - Globalisation & the Law
Regulating bad behaviour online (Facilitator: Judge David Harvey)

Regulating bad behaviour online (Facilitator: Judge David Harvey)

New publishing platforms are testing the adequacy of the law and of courts in dealing with harmful speech and offensive behaviour online. Cyber-bullying, hate speech, defamation and malicious impersonation are examples of ill-intentioned actions that, in the digital realm, are quick to injure but slow to redress. The Law Commission considered this and other issues in its December 2011 issues paper The News Media Meets 'New Media': Rights, Responsibilities and Regulations in the Digital Age.

In its paper, the Law Commission proposes the creation of a new “Communications Commissioner” and/or a new “Communications Tribunal” to "administer speedy, efficient and relatively cheap justice to those who have been significantly damaged by unlawful communications". What will the relationship between these new regulators and Internet intermediaries look like? Does a Tribunal-ordered speedy remedy risk proper due process?

This session will examine the Law Commission’s recent work, focusing in particular on harmful speech online and the proposed solutions.
New Zealand 2 - Governance
National Internet governance - local issues (Facilitator: Keith Davidson)

National Internet governance - local issues (Facilitator: Keith Davidson)

The Internet has a history of wide stakeholder engagement and involvement in its development and operations. How best then, to get this range of input into New Zealand Internet Governance issues? This session will take one such issue, management of the .nz ccTLD, and consider how the .nz ccTLD has engaged with the Local Internet Community in setting the framework for the operation of the .nz domain name space. An opportunity will be provided to discuss how this engagement might be extended to ensure a wider range of views are considered as the TLD space develops and as .nz looks to remain current for New Zealand Internet users and businesses.

Currently DNCL (Domain Name Commission Ltd) is consulting on a proposal to allow registrations of .nz domain names directly at the second level. If adopted, this proposal could result in significant change. DNCL’s approach to seeking views on this proposal will form the basis of the session, with time for discussion on both the consultation process being undertaken and on the substantive topic of the proposals themselves. Comments made in this session will be noted and reported back to the DNCL Board for their consideration.
New Zealand 3 - Health
Consumer involvement with their health and wellness information (Facilitator: Sebastian Morgan-Lynch)

Consumer involvement with their health and wellness information (Facilitator: Sebastian Morgan-Lynch)

A single shared electronic health record has been the holy grail of many health systems around the world. However it has proved difficult, complex and expensive to achieve. One of the reasons for failure has been the lack of clinical leadership and consumer involvement.

In the meantime, while health systems have grappled with the complexities of these projects, and often with the public and political fallout from failing to deliver, there is increasing community and consumer demand for change that puts patients as an equal participant in the management of their health and wellness information.

Expert patients and their support networks, community acceptance of eCommerce solutions particularly in the financial and retail sectors of the economy, and the democratisation of specialist medical knowledge and information that the world wide web have all contributed to this environment.

This session will explore the rising demand from the community and canvas issues such as information provenance, privacy implications for the patient and clinician relationship, access control mechanisms, and the security of electronic health information.
New Zealand 4 - Up to Speed
Human rights 101 (Presenter: Jordan Carter), followed by Privacy 101 (Presenter: John Edwards)

Human rights 101 (Presenter: Jordan Carter), followed by Privacy 101 (Presenter: John Edwards)

Human Rights and... the Internet?
As a new place where we live part of our lives, the Internet is somewhere human rights matter. This 101 will explore human rights issues through the example of access to the Internet - who has it, what does it offer, what is missing?

Privacy Law in New Zealand
Privacy law in New Zealand is fragmented and widely distributed across the statute books. At its centre is the Privacy Act, which is nearly 20 years old, and which is based on principles elucidated by the OECD in 1980. The recent extensive review by the Law Commission has suggested that the core of the Act, the information privacy principles should be left largely intact.

This session will look at how the information privacy principles work, their strengths and weaknesses, other sources of privacy law (such as the Harassment Act, s.216 of the Crimes Act and others), and the likely impact of some forthcoming reforms (Electronic Identity Verification Bill, Privacy (Information Sharing) Bill.

Some questions – is an IP address personal information? Why many privacy infringements on social media are effectively unregulated. Is signing up to a 7000 word privacy statement to use a website really necessary?
2.10pmTransition

Transition

Time to move from one session to another...
2.20pm
New Zealand 1 - Globalisation & the Law
Convergence – the elephant in the room (Facilitator: Michael Wigley)

Convergence – the elephant in the room (Facilitator: Michael Wigley)

Convergence is a buzzword, but you'll find you are living with its effects every day. Many of us watch video on our mobile phones. We can make phone calls on our computers. The newspaper doesn't leave newsprint any more, just battery drains on your tablet computer. That is what convergence is: the old reality of a single type of content on a single platform becoming mixed up together. That is what convergence is: the old reality of different types of media on different types of platforms becoming mixed up together in one.

Broadcast, telecommunications and broadband are converging. There are real consequences. What if the same content (a news story) faces different rules depending on the device that you watch it on - your TV, your tablet, your computer, your mobile? The sharp eye kept on the telecommunications industry doesn't exist for broadcasting, and when problems emerge they can take years to tackle. What's the role of content decency rules in an era when anyone anywhere can put video online?

Convergence is real and it's real today. Waiting around isn't an option. Competing economies tackled convergence long ago, in law and in how they structure market regulation. How should we in New Zealand catch up? Australia's recent Convergence Review looked at the legal and regulatory frameworks for media and communications – what lessons can New Zealand learn? What policies would best promote competition, access to world quality content, and promote the open Internet?
New Zealand 2 - Governance
International Internet governance - Who owns the Internet? (Facilitator: Geoff Huston)

International Internet governance - Who owns the Internet? (Facilitator: Geoff Huston)

In 1988 the ITU member nations signed up to a set of regulations that was intended to provide a common regulatory framework to support international telecommunications (International Telecommunications Regulations, or ITRs). The regulations included provisions related to the support and promotion of international telecommunications services as an obligation undertaken by each signing nation. The regulations also included quite specific measures related to the handling of international telephony and the framework of inter-operator financial settlements.

In December of 2012 the ITU members states will again convene to consider amendments to these ITRs. We have already seen a diverse set of proposals to amend these ITRs including provisions that advocate treating the Internet in precisely the same way as telephony, while others advocate changes to the ITRs that increase the set of operational obligations placed on governments. Other proposals include making the current set of ITU-T recommendations (notably including recommendation D.50) mandatory rather than optional. Other nations appear to be proposing to explicitly frame the ITRs such that they do not include the Internet at all in their terms of reference, and continue with the current defacto position of leaving the Internet outside of the current international telecommunications regulatory framework altogether.

What perspectives should frame a New Zealand position on the ITRs?

ICANN issues: We have witnessed a somewhat unexpected sequence of events in recent months where the US Government withheld the re-awarding of the IANA Services contract, and the assumed contractor, ICANN, was left in a somewhat invidious position. It is a common complaint that in the Internet a single nation has assumed a unique position with respect to the governance of some of the Internet’s common resource portfolio, and a number of nations have voiced the opinion that such functions should be undertaken in a manner that does not place any single nation in such a unique position. Other nations have voiced a pragmatic view that while the current situation has its elements of risk, so too do any of the known alternatives, and in such case changing a set of known risks for a more uncertain set of risks does not appear to be an overall improvement of the situation.

What perspectives should frame a New Zealand position on the carriage of the IANA function, the role of ICANN and possible mechanisms that would appropriately express a truly international perspective of the governance of common Internet resources?
New Zealand 3 - Health
Access health information on mobile devices and use of social media (Facilitator: Perrin Rowland)

Access health information on mobile devices and use of social media (Facilitator: Perrin Rowland)

Mobile technology is changing health care practice. Doctors use texting to change lives, support patients and even remind patients to put on sunscreen. Smartphones help practitioners access the latest health warnings, updates and evidence. Some of the newest apps are handbooks of drug information.

When it comes to social media, patients expect more from health care providers. Evidence shows that patients trust and are more likely to share information with their health care providers. They are influenced by these health messages. They want health care organisations to respond to and support their needs. Patients understand or expect their health care practitioners to turn to online sources for information as well.

This session will explore what mobile health and social media have to offer to health practices and how they can be used to improve health outcomes. How do you use mobile technology and social media? How are these practices are already making a difference in New Zealand? How can health care providers tap into support networks, improve information sharing, and community involvement? Building upon what we learned in previous sessions, what do we need to think about concerning security and privacy? And what role does the consumer (patient) play?
New Zealand 4 - Up to Speed
Social Media 101 (Presenter: Callum Valentine), followed by State of Security in NZ 101 (Presenter: Paul McKitrick)

Social Media 101 (Presenter: Callum Valentine), followed by State of Security in NZ 101 (Presenter: Paul McKitrick)

Social Media 101
Callum Valentine si Social Media and Web Journalism Tutor at Whitireia Media Training Center Wellington.

This 20 minute introduction will outline the key players in the Social
Media Scene, and highlight interesting uses and predict coming trends
within social media.

A few quick case studies will look at how social media companies have
behaved with regards to openness - the theme of NetHui 2012.
Part of learning to best use social media involves using third party
tools and Callum will demonstrate one such service - If This Then That
- which allows automated social media sharing.

State of Security in NZ 101
This session aims to bring you up to speed with the state of security in New Zealand in 2012. It will cover at the threats online and threat actors behind them, and their motivations. Then the session will look at the various organisations and initiatives in New Zealand that exist to combat and mitigate these threats.
3.20pmAfternoon Tea (and room reorganisation)

Afternoon Tea (and room reorganisation)

A chance to absorb and discuss everything so far or burn off some energy reorganising the chairs in New Zealand 1&2 ready for the panel discussion!
Promenade
3.44pmTe Kotahitanga - The Being Together as One
3.45pmKeynote - The internet biographies of New Zealanders - Professor Allan Bell and Philippa Smith, AUT, World Internet Project NZ

Keynote - The internet biographies of New Zealanders - Professor Allan Bell and Philippa Smith, AUT, World Internet Project NZ

Stories of how New Zealanders relate to the internet are among the patterns that we can draw from the two-yearly World Internet Project surveys. Here we present snapshots of several individuals and how their perception, attitude, use and valuing of the internet have changed over time. There is the man in his 60s who told us in 2007 that he was very unlikely to connect to the internet. By 2009 he had got broadband, and later became active on Facebook. One young woman’s active online lifestyle makes her the perfect picture of the digital native. And we look at the very different behaviours and online routines of a teenage brother and sister in the same household.

Following our third survey in five years of New Zealanders and the internet, we can now see distinct patterns developing. The early use of e-mail communication was lauded for its ability to connect people whether next door to each other in downtown Auckland, or thousands of kilometres away in Iceland. The internet has affected how people learn, work and play, but also has altered our daily activities and attitudes. The vignettes in our presentation are glimpses of individuals, but they address the many curious, complex and fundamental issues that underlie our constantly developing relationship with the internet.

Have digital divides deepened or collapsed? Will tablets supersede the desktop PCs? - or in fact be taken over by something that is entirely different? Where exactly is social networking taking us now? Where does New Zealand stand in the world in its internet use compared with our international World Internet Project partner countries like Australia and the U.S.? Our presentation links the micro dimension of individual daily lives with the macro trends of our increasingly digital society, and its global context.
---
Allan Bell is Professor of Language & Communication at AUT, and Director of the World Internet Project New Zealand. He is head of AUT's Institute of Culture, Discourse & Communication. For many years he led a dual career combining academic research with journalism and communications consultancy. He has published several books and many articles on media, communication and language, and on social and linguistic aspects of the internet. He is Editor of the international Journal of Sociolinguistics.

Philippa Smith, a researcher with an interest in media and new media technologies, has been with AUT’s Institute of Culture, Discourse & Communication since 2003. As a member of the WIPNZ project team
Philippa has attended several WIP international partners’ meetings, this year held in Dubai. She is a member of the Association of Internet Researchers and has a particular interest in the affects of Internet genres such as blogs, e-lists and social networking sites on the way we communicate. Philippa recently submitted her PhD thesis which examines the construction of New Zealand identity through computer mediated communication.
New Zealand 1&2
4.00pmPanel and Open Mic - Digital Inclusion

Panel and Open Mic - Digital Inclusion

The panel will discuss various types of digital divides- economic, skills, abilities, age, geographic, etc. and consider practical ways that the divides can be bridged to promote digital inclusion.

Moderator: Keith Davidson

Context setting - Neil Jarvis, Emma Smythe

Panelists:
Di Daniels, 2020 Communications Trust
Jacinda Ardern, Labour
Jan Logie, Greens
Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga, National
Potaua Biasiny-Tule, Tangatawhenua.com
Sacha Dylan, Connectos Consulting
New Zealand 1&2
5.30pmNetworking Function

Networking Function

Time for some nibbles and a drink and catching up with everyone
Promenade
6.30pmNetSafe Cyber Security Initiative (NCSI) Meetup (1.5hrs)

NetSafe Cyber Security Initiative (NCSI) Meetup (1.5hrs)

This meetup is open to anybody interested in cyber security awareness raising and education. On June 11, New Zealand’s first official cyber security awareness week kicks off with the launch of the Security Central Website. NetSafe will provide a short review of the Awareness Week, and the awareness raising programme generally, before outlining our thoughts for 2013’s programme.

The effectiveness of the awareness programme is hugely dependent on partner engagement so if you’ve got an opinion on, or an interest in, cyber security awareness and education – we’d love to have you along and hear from you.
New Zealand 1&2 - Event
6.30pmTrans-Pacific Partnership Meetup (1hr)

Trans-Pacific Partnership Meetup (1hr)

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 6.30pm-7.30pm, at NetHui 2012, SkyCity Convention Centre.

Negotiations are underway for the Trans Pacific Partnership - or TPP - a trade "and more" agreement between New Zealand and a host of other countries, including the US. The TPP features a chapter on intellectual property rights, including copyright, which requires that countries recognise certain legal standards, like how long copyright lasts, or, how Internet intermediaries are responsible for the copyright infringement of others.

Join us for a discussion on how the TPP could change New Zealand's copyright law and how these changes could affect the Internet. RSVP by emailing [email protected] (be sure to note which event you are RSVPing to). NetHui registration not required.
New Zealand 3 - Event
6.30pmMeeting of ICT NGOs (2 hrs)

Meeting of ICT NGOs (2 hrs)

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 6.30pm-8.30pm, at NetHui 2012, SkyCity Convention Centre

The meeting is open to any NGO (Non-Governmental Organisation) active in the ICT (Information and Communications Technologies) sector. 1-2 people from any organisation that considers itself an ICT NGO are able to attend.

The free meeting will provide an opportunity to know more about each others' priorities and plans for the year ahead. In turn, this will allow each to get to know each other better and perhaps identify areas of common interest to make the most of limited resources.

RSVP by emailing: [email protected] . NetHui registration not required (but why wouldn't you!).
New Zealand 4 - Event
Thursday 12 July
7.30amWomen and the Net Breakfast (for women)

Women and the Net Breakfast (for women)

InternetNZ is pleased to announce that it is hosting a breakfast for women at this year's NetHui and will be joined by a special guest speaker - Sandra Pickering.

Sandra Pickering is Vodafone New Zealand’s Chief Technology Officer. She leads Vodafone's IT and network teams, which design, build, operate and maintain the company's IT systems and mobile and fixed networks. Prior to joining Vodafone, Sandra worked for IBM.

Sandra will speak about the gender imbalance in field of IT and offer her thoughts on how that imbalance may be addressed, looking at a range of initiatives from encouraging girls to engage with technology and the sciences early on, to inspiring women in their pursuit of technology careers. Sandra can certainly speak from experience; having worked in IT for 30 years, she trained on the job straight from school.

Here are the details:
7.30 - 8.45am, Thursday 12 July
New Zealand 3, SKYCITY Convention Centre

This is exclusive to NetHui attendees only. Places are strictly limited - so get in contact soon!

RSVP is essential - please contact us by emailing [email protected] by 4pm, Wednesday 4 July.

We look forward to seeing you there.
New Zealand 3
8.30amWelcome Coffee
Promenade
9.00amWelcome - MC James Elliott

Welcome - MC James Elliott

James Elliott is a lawyer, columnist and comedian. Writer for TV3's 7 Days, Contributor to the NZ Herald, Herald on Sunday and Listener. Humour commentator on the Week That Was on Nine to Noon and Radiosport.
New Zealand 1&2
9.05amMinsterial Keynote - Hon Steven Joyce
New Zealand 1&2
9.25amKeynote - David Shearer, Leader of the Opposition
9.40amScene Setting - Presenter Nat Torkington

Scene Setting - Presenter Nat Torkington

Thoughts on the discussions on the first day of the conference and the big issues for discussion on the second day.
New Zealand 1&2
9.50amMorning Tea (and room reorganisation)
Promenade
10.09amNgā Kōrerorero - The Discussions
10.10am
New Zealand 1 - Globalisation & the Law
The Evolving Blogosphere - dealing with trolls (Facilitator: Peter Griffin)

The Evolving Blogosphere - dealing with trolls (Facilitator: Peter Griffin)

How do we deal with those who harass, inflame and aggravate discussions and ensure your online interactions are pleasant ones

A discussion on how to stop the 1% (the trolls) from degrading your online experiences. Share your personal tips on what you do when things get heated, and you need to cool things down. What is the best way to respond to criticism from others?

How well do existing policies and practices govern interaction in online communities? Where should the line be drawn in consideration of regulation of the online media landscape when it comes to online discussion and commentary. Is self-regulation working and is regulation even possible?
New Zealand 2 - Openness
Innovation and Open Government (Facilitator: Keitha Booth)

Innovation and Open Government (Facilitator: Keitha Booth)

The Declaration on Open and Transparent Government, released by the Ministers of Finance and Internal Affairs in August 2011, affirmed government's aim for high value public data to be re-used to grow the economy, help people with their daily lives and illustrate its performance openly. It also promoted greater better public services and efficiencies through better sharing of public data.

This session seeks discussion on possible next steps for open government: fostering innovation in New Zealand through partnering with government, and working with civil society to design and deliver government services. It will also report on government departments' progress in adopting the Declaration.
New Zealand 3 - Culture
Building online Te Reo and other multilingual content (Facilitator: Potaua Biasiny-Tule)

Building online Te Reo and other multilingual content (Facilitator: Potaua Biasiny-Tule)

Kia ora whanau. He mihi o te tau hou. Hello and happy Maori new year!

This session will focus on three digital Maori projects to provide a base for discussion of issues around online multilingual development and support.

The projects focused on promoting te reo Maori, connecting Maori communities and empowering whanau everywhere, and demonstrate what can be achieved both for Maori and other languages in New Zealand.

Google Maori: How do we generate interest around a language project, attract the right language experts and build an open team within a closed platform?

Digital Maori: How do we work with people and tools? The gentle art of developing digital Maori projects - from Te Arawa to Ngati Porou, Health to Politics, WordPress to Facebook.

Mobile Maori: What is the future for multilingual development for iPhones and similar devices? How do we tap into mobile users and businesses that use our languages? Lessons learned while creating the
iPhone Maori News app.

During all this, we will korero on language localisation, look at ways to encourage greater language uploads and answer questions from our experience on designing, planning & building innovative platforms.
New Zealand 4 - Safety & Security
Developing a national strategy for a safer online environment (Facilitator: Martin Cocker)

Developing a national strategy for a safer online environment (Facilitator: Martin Cocker)

In this workshop we will explore what a national strategy for creating a safe online environment, would look like.

New Zealand has begun a major upgrade of its internet infrastructure with the UFB. This will connect New Zealanders to each other and the world at much higher speeds. It will also connect the world to New Zealanders at much higher speeds. If you build it, they will come - and not all of them are nice.

Safety is an important consideration in the building of all new infrastructure. For example, as we upgrade roads, we deliberately make those roads safer. Higher speed internet will bring benefits - but it will also bring increased challenge. Any increase in cybercrime and cyber harm will reduce confidence and negatively impact the development of a digital economy.
11.05amTransition
11.10am
New Zealand 1 - Globalisation & the Law
Privacy law reforms: Protecting your data in the cloud and online (Facilitator: Marie Shroff )

Privacy law reforms: Protecting your data in the cloud and online (Facilitator: Marie Shroff )

Privacy and data protection laws are being tested worldwide by ongoing developments in technology and the internet. One effect of this is that privacy regulators and data protection agencies are increasingly working across jurisdictions to try and find effective enforcement and regulatory methods.

Data flows instantaneously across borders and data protection laws today need to reflect this reality. In this global environment, New Zealand businesses will often be subject to standards imposed by overseas regulators.

New Zealand's Privacy Act was passed before we were living our lives online and the Government has recently indicated its intention to introduce a new Act. The session will outline some of the key recommendations from the New Zealand Law Commission's 5 year review of privacy and will explore what it might mean for our privacy framework.
New Zealand 2 - Openness
Digital Content re-use (Facilitator: Andy Neale)

Digital Content re-use (Facilitator: Andy Neale)

The reuse, remix, and mashup of digital content has helped shaped our era of creativity. But we often only think of content as texts, images, video, or music; the boundaries we once saw may no longer apply. We are now recognising that the manifestations of data, software components, and digital representations of the real world can also be reusable objects in their own right.

This session will discuss the current state of digital reuse in NZ, and what we would like to see in the future. What are our young people learning about digital reuse, and what are their practices? How are we approaching commercial reuse? And what does the rise of 3D printing mean for the reuse of digital material?
New Zealand 3 - Education
Approaches to deal with accessibility and inclusion. (Facilitator: Kathe Tawhiwhirangi-Perry)

Approaches to deal with accessibility and inclusion. (Facilitator: Kathe Tawhiwhirangi-Perry)

There is a lack of awareness of what accessibility and inclusion is, a lack of empathy with disabilities (especially those that are non-visible), a lack of understanding of how accessibility can be approached, no human rights perspective of the need for equity for all and no human rights perspective to the role of the Internet in providing information. Where some elements of awareness do exist it is often not seen as part of the job of the teacher but an add-on that some mythical specialist will provide. While these things sit across much of society and aren't unique to education, if accessibility is missing in education it weakens the foundation of all other learning and outcomes for those disadvantaged and so degrades life opportunities.

This session will ask you to consider what rights are fundamental for users, how universal design would address that for all learners and does it really need to be seen as a difficult thing. How does current practice meet those rights? What needs to change in order to enable equitable futures for all learners? How can accessible practice be made the default position rather than an add-on or extra piece of work? What is the impact of ubiquitous and personal IT? What is the impact of UFB and a connected world where classes work collaboratively in national and international contexts. There will be learners with needs that you cannot possibly predict using content that is developed locally. We don't think that this should stop us working locally, globally and collaboratively and equally we don't think that any learners should be disenfranchised. Bring your issues to the discussion and bring visions of what education would look like if those issues were resolved.

Are there technical issues to be considered in BYOD to truly make it BYOB(rowser) and can standards have a role to play without comprising spontaneity? Is there a need for compromise to get the simple stuff universally inclusive? Who can help - would a group of easily accessible (in the other sense of the word) yet diverse specialists be useful to mainstream teaching? How can you tell whether a piece of content will cause issues? How do you plan for ensuring accessible resources (braille, large print) when the curriculum no longer revolves around a set text book? Does this mean you need to be an expert in AT? (Hint - no). Where are the AT and other specialist resources? Should we meet up at the bar camp on Friday to make that happen?

What actions are required in order to make genuine progress in this area?
What is the effect on other sectors and what part can they play in bringing improvement e.g. government, business. What role to teacher colleges and training schools have in making a future that works? What can I do on a daily basis that makes a difference? Isn’t Google Docs the answer to all the questions?

Some resources:
Min Ed site on Accessibility in schools only talks about the physical environment e.g. Wheelchair access http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/Schools/PropertyToolBox/StateSchools/Funding/SpEdPropertyProvision/PropModifGuidelinesSpecialEduNeeds/AccesibleModernLearningEnvironment.aspx

Athen Report on accessibility of Gmail & Calendar http://athenpro.org/google-gmail-calendar-accessibility

Athen Report on the Accessibility of Google Documents
http://athenpro.org/google-docs-accessibility

UK Employers Forum notes on disability
http://www.efd.org.uk/media-centre/facts-and-figures/disability-in-uk
New Zealand 4 - Safety & Security
Establishing a Consumer Standard for New Zealand Websites (Facilitator : Sean Lyons)

Establishing a Consumer Standard for New Zealand Websites (Facilitator : Sean Lyons)

[Discuss the possibility of establishment of a set of criteria, by those in the industry as to what a client can expect when contracting someone to build a website. It could include expectations and selection of hosting services, responsibility for application security, standard clauses in a template based website contract, domain registration protocols for beginners, expectations for support and security maintenance.

Lance Wiggs blog post Buyers and Sellers guide to Web Design and Development firms comprehensively described what both clients and developers can expect when contracting to build a website.
http://lancewiggs.com/2012/05/10/buyers-and-sellers-guide-to-web-design-and-development-firms/
This provides a good insight into the world of online development at a level that kicks in around $3 to $5000 but perhaps those on both sides of the negotiating table have a reasonable degree of understanding. A quick scan of various daily voucher offer websites would suggest that there is a whole world of web based business that is going on, in the hundreds of dollars, not the thousands, with some pretty loose terms, and even looser ideas about who is responsible for what.

We have seen many times the results of poorly thought out, poorly secured, poorly managed mission critical web applications, where the end result sees the business owner and the web developer left pointing fingers at each other while consumers watch their transaction data fly off into unsecured cyber space. A set of criteria endorsed by industry could provide clarity for both consumers and developers, leading to increased confidence and participation in online commerce and the NZ web space in general.
12.05pmLunch
Promenade
12.55pm
New Zealand 1 - Economy & Business
Business in the Cloud (Facilitator: Ben Kepes)

Business in the Cloud (Facilitator: Ben Kepes)

Cloud Computing brings a number of technologies (many of which existed before) and delivers them in new ways. Beyond the technicalities of the cloud however, cloud computing arguably introduces some challenges to individuals and entities who have concerned about access and security and, as the megaUpload case showed, may prove problematic when data is stored offshore.

There is an industry-led, and recently released, initiative developing a Cloud Computing Code of Practice (www.nzcloudcode.org.nz). This session should also take a look at the code and explore the issues that end users and businesses currently face in terms of privacy and security, or data sovereignty, in the cloud.
New Zealand 2 - Access
Accessibility and online government services (Facilitator: Kevin Prince)

Accessibility and online government services (Facilitator: Kevin Prince)

The Government has stated that e-Govt is one of its priorities and that the rollout of ultra-fast broadband (UFB) and the Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) is key to ensuring that the services are accessible to all. However, this is a limited definition as accessibility of e-Govt means that a particular user has the equipment, the skill, the bandwidth, the money and the desire to go online and access Government Services.

So what does that mean in the context of this discussion? Firstly having a piece of fibre passing my door does not mean I have access - I have to connect to that fibre and that takes money - sufficient to run an internet connection, to put some end-user equipment on the end of it and the skill to make use of it. There are other ways to do this (internet café, kiosk, mobile etc) but ultimately citizens will still need the option to access service in person and by phone. People also need that when things go wrong.

Having assumed that we all agree that online is an option and not an ultimatum then accessibility of e-Govt is a complex beast and this session aims to raise awareness of the need for universal design to meet the range of devices, assistive technology and cognition that a service for every citizen requires. Just some thoughts - is something truly an online service if I have to print a form and sign it, how will the online identity work, is pdf truly accessible, there is a digital divide around services, affordability and interest, are NZ Govt Web Standards ready for this challenge?

Getting access through ensuring standards based design is not just about enabling access for the disabled, and it is about being open to all. Even more it's about ensuring that every citizen that wants to, can take advantage of the convenience of online service effectively.
New Zealand 3 - Education
Sustainable ICT: The acquisition, use and disposal of technology (Facilitator: Paul Seiler)

Sustainable ICT: The acquisition, use and disposal of technology (Facilitator: Paul Seiler)

Individual and societal expectations of technology seem to grow much faster than the budget to fund them. Demands for more access (both devices and bandwidth) grow with these expectation and yet the funding often does not. What are education institutions doing to manage and cope? Some examples include implementing a “Bring your own device” (BYOD) policy, making more use of open source/standards/data or joining in on syndicated procurements such as the all of government approach to ICT, etc? How is this working for you? What issues or needs still remain unmet?

In the use of technologies we have a growing focus on true costs of implementation and change management, especially the training of teachers and learners to use the technology effectively. How well are you managing here? What is working? Are there systemic issues that need remedying?

Then at the end of life how should we dispose of any hardware in a responsible way? Are the right incentives, systems and structures in place to cater for this? Are we modelling the right behaviour to those learning from us?
New Zealand 4 - Safety & Security
Resilience to online scams (Faciltiator: Lee Chisholm)

Resilience to online scams (Faciltiator: Lee Chisholm)

A jointly hosted workshop with the members of the Inter Agency Working Group (NetSafe, Ministry of Consumer Affairs, and Department of Internal Affairs) exploring the New Zealand public’s resilience to online scams. The working group will present data collected by the members and look at the existing strategies for building resilience to, and responding to scams. The IAWG would appreciate input from professionals working in the banking, e-commerce, mobile payment, and financial literacy fields.
1.50pmTransition
1.55pm
New Zealand 1 - Economy & Business
Taking advantage of UFB infrastructure (Facilitator: Paul Brislen)

Taking advantage of UFB infrastructure (Facilitator: Paul Brislen)

It’s the most important piece of work for the internet in New Zealand, so how is it going, and when is it coming to your house? What can we do to accelerate the take-up of UFB by businesses and consumers, and how are we going to make it pay off for the economy?
The UFB program promises to enable significant economic gains for New Zealand, so what are we going to do as it arrives? Is it time to change the way we do business, or is it really just more of the same, only faster? How will we remove the cursed low data caps, and will UFB be affordable to anyone at all?
What are businesses going to do to take advantage of the change?
New Zealand 2 - Access
Internet and Pacific communities (Facilitator: Ellen Strickland)

Internet and Pacific communities (Facilitator: Ellen Strickland)

Talofa lava, Kia orana, Malo e lelei, Fakaalofa lahi atu, Bula vinaka, Talofa ni, Halo ola keta, Mauri, Kia ora; hello and a warm invitation to a session of open discussion exploring the opportunities and issues for Pacific communities around Internet access and use. This session will be a place to talanoa, to share experiences and to discuss visions, plans and work being done, with attendees from around the Pacific Islands as well as the Pacific communities of New Zealand.

Pacific communities around the world are increasingly able to connect to and through the Internet. This session will explore how Pacific communities and peoples are using the Internet- for connecting families, for education, for culture and language, for business and for entertainment and socialising, especially as mobiles and mobile internet bring new opportunities for connectivity. What are the impacts? What are the challenges? Come along and share your perspective and experiences.
New Zealand 3 - Education
Digital Literacy and digital citizenship (Facilitator: Dave Moskovitz)

Digital Literacy and digital citizenship (Facilitator: Dave Moskovitz)

How are Digital Literacy and Digital Citizenship taught and learned in real world environments? How do we train learners to think, and understand the context in which they're evaluating information? What strategy are primary and secondary teachers finding successful in providing experiential learning in this area? How are refugees, seniors, and digital newbies acquiring the skills they need to be responsible online citizens? This session will provide a forum for diverse groups to work together on the key issues.
New Zealand 4 - Safety & Security
Improving the Cybersecurity of New Zealand (Facilitator: Paul McKitrick)

Improving the Cybersecurity of New Zealand (Facilitator: Paul McKitrick)

Cyber security is of increasing importance to everyone- from
individuals seeking to control their own information online to
Governments viewing it as the next battlefield to corporates
protecting their valuable data. Sometimes cyber security issues are
publicly discussed but typically discussions are behind closed doors.

The purpose of this session is to get a better understanding of the
current issues of cyber security; discuss the roles of different
sectors; and an overview of different initiatives. A key aspect to be
discussed is the relationship between cybersecurity, the consequent
need for Government control, and the balance with an open Internet.
The discussion will be supplemented by looking at two specific
initiatives related to a survey of cybersecurity issues and removing
malware from customers' devices.

The session will be facilitated by Paul McKitrick, Chair of the New Zealand
Internet Task Force (NZITF). Paul will start the session with an
overview of the current situation and then invite discussion. Towards
the end of the session, the two specific initiatives will be
introduced by Zahra Champion and Vikram Kumar respectively.
2.50pmTransition
2.55pm
New Zealand 1 - Economy & Business
NZ’s start-up and internet business ecosystem (Facilitator: Lance Wiggs)

NZ’s start-up and internet business ecosystem (Facilitator: Lance Wiggs)

New Zealand’s start-up ecosystem continues to develop. In the last year we saw some exits, good funding rounds with local and overseas investors and a continuous stream of new companies appearing. Are we happy with the state of affairs, or do we need to keep working on creating a richer primordial soup?
Funding sources are interesting in NZ, as there seems to be plenty of money for housing or partial sell downs, and some start-ups do very well. But there also appear to be very few lead funders for internet start-ups, so what can we do to promote more?
Xero went down the IPO route - is that credible for others now? What about the VIF program - is it a success yet?
Is New Zealand producing the right talented educated people, and are we retaining them? Do we do enough to help them transition to start-up world?
Are we helping local companies access international markets well, or do we expect that anything online will sell itself?
What regulations and agreements are helping and hindering the sector - what do we need to change?
New Zealand 2 - Access
Access and human rights (Facilitator: Joy Liddicoat)

Access and human rights (Facilitator: Joy Liddicoat)

Last week, in an unprecedented move, 82 governments at the United Nations Human Rights Council affirmed a very simple concept:

“The same rights that people have offline must be protected online”

Global debates about whether access to the Internet should be a human right are increasing. In January 2012, Vint Cerf declared access to the Internet was not a human right, sparking a controversial and lively global debate: http://bit.ly/zbp253

This session will explore the current state of debate in New Zealand about access to the Internet and human rights. The New Zealand government did not sign the UN resolution. What do New Zealanders think and how can we contribute to these debates locally, nationally, regionally and globally?

Access to the Internet is a multi-dimensional concept including: access to infrastructure, access to content, participation in Internet governance and access to Internet related policy making. Universal service obligations, rural services, openness, free expression and limits such as content filtering: all have potential impacts on access to the Internet. Participants will be encouraged to share diverse perspectives on Internet access focusing on the following questions:

*What are the main technical, commercial and policy obstacles to achieving universal affordable access to Internet infrastructure (including broadband and mobile)?
* Are there any obstacles to access to knowledge and content online?
* How do human rights and Internet access connect?
* Are Internet governance issues relevant to Internet access?
* What are the challenges and opportunities for policy makers and the local Internet community to work on these issues together?

New Zealand 3 - Education
Sharing in a competing environment (Facilitator: Tim Kong)

Sharing in a competing environment (Facilitator: Tim Kong)

One of the touchstones for education is that it is seen as a profession, and those within it act as professionals. There is a desire by those in the education sector to be seen as professionals, and paid as professionals. At the same time education is inherently about sharing. Sharing knowledge, sharing resources, sharing ideas - for the purpose of spreading learning. For those from the business and political sphere, being a professional, usually means being driven by competition. This model of thinking sees performance based pay as part of the solution to raising student achievement. The current model for funding of schools is based on competition, specifically, the more students you have, the more funding you have.

The somewhat oxymoronic phrase “competitive collaboration” as stated in Hekia Parata’s speech from January 2012, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IdOful-aZU&feature=youtu.be&t=14m, comes loaded with perceptions about professionalism, the purpose and intent of what learning is, and what values we place on both competition and collaboration.

This government is investing in systems such as the UFB network, to ostensibly encourage collaboration, while at the same time imposing systems such as National Standards, from which league tables can be used to competitively match schools against each other.

How and what does collaboration look like in this environment? How can healthy competition be encouraged in these environments? How does competitive collaboration change classroom and organisational practises?
New Zealand 4 - Culture
Culture and Copyright (Facilitator: Nat Torkington)

Culture and Copyright (Facilitator: Nat Torkington)

Today’s pop culture is tomorrow’s heritage, and today’s history articact was yesterday’s fashion. We have industries creating material, industries distributing it, and cultural institutions preserving and providing access to it. Not only do these institutions shine a light on the past, they often provide democratic access to culture: libraries as the back-stop of literacy and life-long learning, galleries as venues for public encounters with art, museums as connectors of the past with the present.

There are tremendous opportunities as the works of these institutions become digital and move online, but also great challenges. What should be collected? How do we balance democratic access against the needs of authors and artists to live and eat? And these are very Western concepts: not all Maori knowledge is for public access, and the traditional practices for safeguarding and sharing it sit poorly with our legal structures.

What should be preserved? What should be accessed, and by whom? What rights have the owners to limit that access, and does some cultural knowledge deserve separate protection? Digital technology lets us do different things, but which things should we do? The market, the legislature, the marae, and the library are all confronting these questions. Participants will discuss the topic, exploring the underlying questions and attempting to see the different perspectives.
3.50pmAfternoon Tea (and room reorganisation)
Promenade
4.09pmTe Kotahitanga - The Being Together as One
4.10pmPanel and Open Mic - Open Government

Panel and Open Mic - Open Government

The term 'Open Government' means different things to different people. The panel will look at these multiple perspectives and consider the important steps required to promote Open Government in New Zealand.

Moderator: Julian Carver

Context setting: Pia Waugh, Vikram Kumar

Panelists:
Clare Curran, Labour
Colin Macdonald, Government CIO and Chief Executive, DIA
David Farrar, Kiwiblog
Julie-Anne Genter, Greens
Mia Garlick, Facebook
Prof Miriam Lips, Chair in E-Government, Victoria University of Wellington
Nikki Kaye, National
New Zealand 1&2
5.30pmNetworking Function
Promenade
6.00pmCreative Commons Meetup (1 hr)

Creative Commons Meetup (1 hr)

Creative Commons licences are an important aspect of wider movements facing our tertiary sector: Open Access to research outputs, and Open Education Resources. Academics have seen international tensions between the drive to make publicly funded research available to taxpayers, and the traditionally closed models of the publishing industry. There is also an urgent push to lower the cost of producing educational materials, and providing free access to them online for public consumption.

How can twenty first century researchers and tertiary education providers navigate their rights and responsibilities in regards to their work? How do we help realise 'Open Research' and its relationship to 'Open Government'? What are our expectations for 'Open Education'?

Join us for an evening of information and discussion on the Open Access and OER Movements, and how New Zealand can move toward better access to publicly funded tertiary outputs.

If you’re interested in coming along, please email [email protected]
New Zealand 3 - Event
6.30pmInternetNZ AGM (2 hrs)

InternetNZ AGM (2 hrs)

Prospective members are welcome to come and get a taste of what InternetNZ is all about. Please RSVP, to assist with planning, to [email protected]
New Zealand 1&2 - Event
6.30pmMāori IT Movers & Shakers Meet Up (2 hrs)

Māori IT Movers & Shakers Meet Up (2 hrs)

How can Digital Citizens acknowledge the Treaty of Waitangi?". Participants include members from Nga Pu Waea, 2Degrees Mobile, Te Huaraki Tika Maori Spectrum Trust, NZ Maori Internet Society, .iwi.nz, Tangata Whenua.com and a Google Ambassador. If you have an opinion on Maori issues or government policy that effects Maori ICT, Iwi, Marae etc. you are all welcome to this public meeting. Maybe you are just curious what is a Maori ICT issue is or you are conscious of digital Treaty issues. It is anticipated this will be the first of many Maori hui at Net Hui. Nau mai, Tauti mai, Haere mai koutou.

Followed by Dinner, 9pm Venue TBD

RSVP: Potaua Biasiny-Tule
New Zealand 4 - Event
6.30pmOrcon Great Blend (5 hrs)

Orcon Great Blend (5 hrs)

Public Address's famous Great Blend event comes to NetHui, in association with Orcon and The Edge. A theme of "creativity in the internet age" will be developed by some of Auckland's smartest young musicians and artists until the night becomes what it always was -- a party. As ever, the event will be curated by Public Address founder Russell Brown -- who likes thinking and dancing.
Civic Wintergarden - Event
Friday 13 July
8.30amWelcome Coffee
8.59amTe Kotahitanga - The Being Together as One
9.00amWelcome - MC James Elliott

Welcome - MC James Elliott

James Elliott is a lawyer, columnist and comedian. Writer for TV3's 7 Days, Contributor to the NZ Herald, Herald on Sunday and Listener. Humour commentator on the Week That Was on Nine to Noon and Radiosport.
New Zealand 1&2
9.05amScene Setting - InternetNZ Chief Executive Vikram Kumar

Scene Setting - InternetNZ Chief Executive Vikram Kumar

Looking at the big Internet issues expected to come up over the year ahead. In addition, thoughts on NetHui going forward.
New Zealand 1&2
9.20amKeynote - Judge David Harvey

Keynote - Judge David Harvey

The themes of Judge Harvey's keynote are change and rules in a world without boundaries.
He considers the nature and qualities of the new digital paradigm, characterised by constant disruptive change and permissionless invocation and the effect these are having on our behaviours, attitudes and values, moulded by the pervasiveness of information communication technologies.

He considers whether traditional rule making has a place in and environment where we shape our tools and then our tools shape us - continually and whether there are advantages in looking to the past for solutions to the future. He has some challenging thoughts on the place of privacy concepts and copyright theory as examples of why "rear-view mirror" thinking should not be applied in the in the digital paradigm.
New Zealand 1&2
10.00amPanel and Open Mic - Making the most of Economic Opportunities

Panel and Open Mic - Making the most of Economic Opportunities

The panel will consider the opportunities as well as challenges for New Zealand to maximise the benefits and meet the challenges the Internet provides for New Zealand's economic prosperity.

Moderator: Lance Wiggs

Context setting: Russel Norman, Greens; David Grimmond, Infometrics; Shamubeel Eaqub, NZIER

Panelists:
Antony Royal, Nga Pu Waea
Fran O'Sullivan, Journalist, Pacific Economic Cooperation Council
Michael O'Donnell, Trade Me
Rodney Macfarlane, MEA Mobile
Russel Norman, Greens
Stephen Knightly, NZ Game Developers Association
Dr William Rolleston, South Pacific Sera Ltd.
New Zealand 1&2
11.20amMorning Tea
Promenade
11.30amPanel and Open Mic - Making the most of Creative Opportunities

Panel and Open Mic - Making the most of Creative Opportunities

The Internet provides New Zealand creatives with new ways to make money online; new business models; and new opportunities globally. At the same time, there are some real challenges as the Internet makes profound changes to well established channels, mindsets, and market structures. The panel will consider all these issues.

Moderator: Dave Moskovitz

Context setting - Matt Mulholland, Anna Guenther

Panelists:
Anna Guenther, PledgeMe
Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, Creative Freedom Foundation
Darren Hunter, Ziln
Fraser Brown, Creative Producer
John Ferguson, NZTE
Richard Hulse, Radio NZ
Stephen O'Hoy, Digital Rights Management NZ, Amplifier, theaudience
New Zealand 1&2
12.50pmWrap up - James Elliott, then Poroporoaki - Kaumātua Brian Joyce
New Zealand 1&2
1.05pmLunch (and room reorganisation)
Promenade
1.55pmBarcamp Introduction

Barcamp Introduction

What is a Barcamp?

A Barcamp (also known as an un-conference) is an event with no set program or speakers. You decide what subjects you want to discuss and in what format. The Net Hui Barcamp will be created by you starting around 2:00PM on the Friday. Please come along! You can propose ideas for discussion subjects at any time during NetHui at the InternetNZ booth. It's a great place to build on the discussion from the main conference sessions, and form groups to translate talk into action.
New Zealand 1
2.25pm
Marlborough 1
Barcamp - OCLANZ Working Group
Marlborough 2
Barcamp - Accessibility
Marlborough 3
Barcamp - Libraries
New Zealand 1
Barcamp - Internet Democracy
New Zealand 2
Barcamp - Hacking and Making
3.15pmTransition
3.25pm
Marlborough 1
Barcamp - Media & Public Service
Marlborough 2
Barcamp - Safety & Citizenship
Marlborough 3
Barcamp - Learning & Games
New Zealand 1
Barcamp - Copyright & Creative Commons
New Zealand 2
Barcamp - About the Tubes
4.15pmAfternoon Tea
Promenade
4.30pm
Marlborough 1
Barcamp - Design & Usability
Marlborough 2
Barcamp - Womens Issues
Marlborough 3
Barcamp - Moving to Actions
New Zealand 1
Barcamp - TPP, DRM & Politics
New Zealand 2
Barcamp - The Future
5.20pmBarcamp Wrap up
New Zealand 1